Journal 69


 

ABSTRACT OF # 69


Revue du Cercle de Généalogie Juive # 69

January-March 2002  

DOCUMENT

Preliminary document for the 1784 census of the Jews of Odratzheim

Jean-Pierre Kleitz

Jean-Pierre KLEITZ publishes the document prepared by the Jewish community of Odratzheim as the basis for the 1784 Census of Alsatian Jews (from the sources at the Archives Départementales du Bas-Rhin).  This document is more comprehensive than the one for Rosheim published in our previous issue. It also contains three birth and one death record. J.P. KLEITZ has established an index of the places cited.


Mariages in Constantine (Algeria) in 1851

Fernand Deray

Fernand DERAY has completed the tabulation of the Jewish marriages in Constantine between 1848 and 1893. The full compilation is intended to be published by Cercle de Généalogie Juive on a CD-ROM.

 

FAMILIES

The Meyer Mutzig family in Ribeauvillé (Alsace) in the XVIIIth century

Laurent Kassel

The author compares a manuscript from the New York Jewish Theological Seminary and the marriage records in Mémoire Juive en Alsace. This allows him to build the genealogy of Meyer Mutzig. He also peruses the figures in the various censuses taken in the village during the XVIIIth century and the taxes paid by the Jews. Ascendancy and origin of the patronym Nerson


Ernest Kallmann

Ernest KALLMANN informs about new results in his research about the Nersum/Nerson family. Recently published search instruments (e.g. Tables du Memorbuch de Metz (1720-1849) by Jean-Claude Bouvat-Martin) confirm that the family moved from Frankfurt/Main to Metz around 1700. Examining EleToledot (the record by Shlomo Ettlinger of all Jews buried in Frankfurt from 1241 to 1820) the author connects with Neresheim, a village in Bavaria and the Frankfurt Jews bearing this name. He traces Nersum ancestors back to the XVIth century, and settles a long-lasting discussion about the origin of the family name.

 

PARIS CHRONICLE

The genealogy of a peddler

Paris chronicle : this is the title of a new section in the Revue, devoted to the genealogy and the history of individuals or families from a yet unpublished document : the Register of  the Paris Consistoire (Council)1809-1810.

The first example, given by J.B., is the genealogy of a peddler. Abraham Saint (sic) Leon, in fact Abraham van D. Leon, arrives in Paris a short time after having married in Amsterdam Rachel Carvalho in march 1809. The author describes the families of the newly wed, among which most are marranos.

 

 MISCELLANEOUS

A ketubah from Nîmes (February 12, 1813)

Max POLONOVSKi shows a ketubah kept at the Beth Tzedek synagogue in Toronto, and thus slightly more recent than the one shown in issue 67 of the Revue. The wedding is between Mardochée Crémieux and Liotte Valabrègue. All the people involved in the ceremony can be identified thanks to the signatures of the witnesses.


André SUARES

Michel DROUIN publishes the genealogy of the French writer André Suarès (Marseille June 12, 1868-Saint-Maur- des -Fossés September 7, 1948). He analyses his behavior with respect to his Jewish roots.

 

RECENT EVENTS

Ernest KALLMANN  reports about the Obermayer Jewish Genealogy Award ceremony, honoring German individuals having shown outstanding achievements in preserving Jewish heritage.

Marcia Haddad IKONOMOPOULOS, head of The Society Friends of Greek Jewry, invites to the ceremony to be held in Corfu on June 9 and 10, 2002 to honor the Corfu Jews murdered in June 1944.

Gilbert DAHAN formally writes to the mayor of  Béziers (France). He deeply regrets that the ancient name rue de la Juiverie (ghetto street) will be changed to  Petite Jerusalem (little Jerusalem) which obliterates the historical memory of the local Jewish community.

 

BOOK REVIEW

Cercle de Généalogie Juive publishes Basile GINGER's  the 'Guide Pratique de Généalogie Juive en France et à l'Etranger' (in French), a handbook for beginners and seasoned genealogists whether searching in France or searching in Europe from France.

Bernard LYON-CAEN and Françoise JOB review 'Regards sur la culture judéo-alsacienne' and 'Troyes et ses Juifs'.

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS